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Image Interpretation updates

Image Interpretation updates

Credit: NHS Improvement national patient safety team

Published: Sunday, 15 April 2018
The highly popular Image Interpretation programme continues to evolve and develop, with two significant updates in recent weeks.

New sessions on nasogastric tube placement

In the light of new patient safety publications, two new sessions on nasogastric (NG) tube placement are now available:
  • Using Chest Radiographs to Identify Nasogastric Tube Placement
  • Safe Practice and Clinical Governance

The first session covers the main principles of identifying the NG tube position on a chest radiograph. It also describes how to identify if the NG tube should be advanced and the relevant safety issues. The second session highlights the clinical governance and safety issues involved with assessing radiographs for the correct NG tube placement.exi 33 02 10 01 50

Module Editor and Consultant Radiographer Dr Nick Woznitza, said: “Accurate interpretation of chest radiographs for nasogastric placements is an essential role in maintaining patient safety. These sessions provide the core knowledge required in an accessible format.”

Non-obstetric ultrasound sessions updated

In other news, the non-obstetric ultrasound e-learning sessions have also been comprehensively reviewed and updated.

These sessions cover abdominal, vascular, gynaecological, head and neck, musculoskeletal and testes/prostate scanning. Each session includes images of normal and abnormal appearances, as well as interactive exercises, links to useful reference sources, tips on report writing and how to avoid common pitfalls associated with ultrasound imaging. Chest x-ray

Lyndsey Callion, Instructional Designer at e-Learning for Healthcare, said: ''The ultrasound sessions have proved extremely popular over the past few years: they were accessed almost 7000 times in 2017 alone. Of course, clinical guidelines are constantly changing, and these updates reflects the latest clinical developments and best practice.”


For further information about this programme, please take a look at our Image Interpretation page.